national history museum
national history museum
national history museum
national history museum
natural history museum
national history museum
national history museum

When you live in London the Natural History Museum becomes a place you would frequent on a school trip however rarely visit outside those years. Finding a day to swing by when it isn’t bustling with tourists fyi that day doesn’t exist means that since I left my school days behind I’ve hardly been back. That all changed the other weekend when I braved South Ken and joined the queues to rediscover the rooms of mammals and fossils. Considering entry is free the building is pretty breathtakingly beautiful and they are constantly adding new exhibitions inside to attract the crowds.

Visiting the weekend before everyone returned to work resulted in queues on mass (even to get through the front door) however once inside you can choose which rooms to visit meaning the hoards of people can be nearly avoided. New in is their Darwin Center, a chance to explore research facilities, talk to scientists all whilst viewing over 80 million specimens. There is also the   Volcano and Earthquake Gallery complete with earthquake simulator where you can discover plate tectonics and feel the ripples from a quake.

A big winner for all visitors is the dinosaur exhibition. When I visited this did require a second queue inside the foyer however for dino enthusiasts, or not, this is well worth a viewing. A large enclosed exhibition space with a special addition at the end (I won’t give it away and spoil it!) for those that want to learn more, just see some dinos or if you are visiting with young children, it’s a winner all round. If that isn’t enough, bookmark March in your calendars for the Coral Reefs: Secret Cities of the Sea.